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Anat Cell Biol

Published online October 6, 2022

https://doi.org/10.5115/acb.22.009

Copyright © Korean Association of ANATOMISTS.

Concomitant variations of the tibialis anterior, and extensor hallucis longus, and extensor hallucis brevis muscles

Jenilkumar Patel1 , Graham Dupont1 , Joho Katsuta2,3 , Joe Iwanaga4,5,6 , Łukasz Olewnik7 , R. Shane Tubbs4,5,8,9,10,11,12

1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA, 2Katsuta Osteopathic Clinic, Itoshima, Fukuoka, 3Kyushu Medical Sports Vocational School, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka, Japan, 4Department of Neurosurgery, Tulane Center for Clinical Neurosciences, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 5Department of Neurology, Tulane Center for Clinical Neurosciences, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA, 6Division of Gross and Clinical Anatomy, Department of Anatomy, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan, 7Department of Anatomical Dissection and Donation, Medical University of Łódź, Poland, 8Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George’s University, St. George’s, Grenada, West Indies, 9Department of Structural & Cellular Biology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 10Department of Surgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 11Department of Neurosurgery and Ochsner Neuroscience Institute, Ochsner Health System, New Orleans, LA, USA, 12University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

Correspondence to:Joe Iwanaga
Department of Neurosurgery, Tulane Center for Clinical Neurosciences, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
E-mail: iwanagajoeca@gmail.com

Received: January 12, 2022; Revised: May 14, 2022; Accepted: July 7, 2022

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle originates from the lateral surface of tibia and its tendon attaches to the medial cuneiform and base of the first metatarsal. The TA muscle is responsible for both dorsiflexion and inversion of the foot. We present a case of bilateral TA muscle variations that diverge slightly from the current classification systems of this muscle. Recognizing variations such as these may be important for anatomists, surgeons, podiatrists, and physicians. Following routine dissection, an accessory tendon of the TA muscle was found on both sides. Accessory tendons of the extensor hallucis longus and extensor hallucis brevis joined to form a common tendon on both sides. We believe that this unique case will help further the classification systems for the tendons of the TA and also be informative for clinical anatomists as well as physicians treating patients with pathology in this region.

Keywords: Leg, Anatomy, Cadaver, Foot

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