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Anat Cell Biol

Published online July 30, 2020

https://doi.org/10.5115/acb.20.054

Copyright © Korean Association of ANATOMISTS.

A rare cadaveric case of a duplicated internal thoracic artery

Harry Nanthakumar1 , Joe Iwanaga1 , Aaron S. Dumont1 , R. Shane Tubbs1,2,3,4

1Department of Neurosurgery, Tulane Center for Clinical Neurosciences, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 2Department of Structural and Cellular Biology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 3Department of Neurosurgery and Ochsner Neuroscience Institute, Ochsner Health System, New Orleans, LA, USA, 4Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George’s University, St. George’s, Grenada, West Indies

Correspondence to:Joe Iwanaga
Department of Neurosurgery, Tulane Center for Clinical Neurosciences, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA
E-mail: iwanagajoeca@gmail.com

Received: March 13, 2020; Revised: May 20, 2020; Accepted: June 5, 2020

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The internal thoracic artery (ITA) arises from the subclavian artery and terminates as the musculophrenic and inferior epigastric arteries. During routine cadaveric dissection, an aberrant left ITA was discovered. A medial and a lateral branch of the ITA branched directly off the subclavian artery as opposed to bifurcating at the 6th or 7th intercostal space. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of this particular ITA variation arising from the third part of the subclavian artery. Additionally, such a variant might also be considered a high bifurcation of the ITA. Our report examines this variation and its potential implications for coronary artery bypass grafts where the ITA is commonly used.

Keywords: Mammary arteries, Subclavian artery, Coronary artery bypass

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